pumps

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spurry posted on Tue, Sep 8 2009 10:33 AM

I know this has been asked a million times but ....

Son diagnosed with type 1 in may of this year and lately it has just been a ride, with sugars often high. Diet, compliance is no problem. He's on lantus and humalog.  When is he pump worthy? Does he have to stabilize? Does anyone switch to the pump while they have labile blood sugars? What is it about a pump that allows tighter control, or is that false?

On a different note, I do the cooking and yesterday I was in the grocery and almost in tears. It just hit me again. I've been fine since that first week but yesterday was just too much for some reason.  It felt like a completely random event, but there I am, looking at labels and trying not to cry.  He's only 10 and I love him so much.

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Ron AKA replied on Tue, Sep 8 2009 11:00 AM

spurry:
Son diagnosed with type 1 in may of this year and lately it has just been a ride, with sugars often high. Diet, compliance is no problem. He's on Lantus and Humalog.  When is he pump worthy? Does he have to stabilize? Does anyone switch to the pump while they have labile blood sugars? What is it about a pump that allows tighter control, or is that false?

10 years is old enough for a pump. I would say that getting BG under control should be the first priority. Something to discuss with the endo, as it may take some time to organize. 

Pumps do provide better control of BG, especially between meals and overnight. The difference is the insulin used and that it is injected continuously. Pumps use very fast acting insulin like Humalog or Novolog. A bolus dose is pumped just before each meal, similar to manually injecting it. However between meals and overnight, the pump is programed to keep injecting small amounts of the same insulin to control the between meal requirements(basal). Once you figure out when more and less insulin is needed during the day, the pump can be programed to do that. With Lantus controlling your basal requirements you are at the mercy of how much you injected, and how uniform that Lantus acts over the 24 hours. In comparison to a pump it is quite crude.

Using multiple daily injections you may want to ask about switching to two shots per day of Levemir, and then Novolog for meals. Levemir has been found to be more predictable in response from day to day, and two shots per day can give you more uniform control. Novolog may be slightly better than Humalog, as it is a bit faster acting, and most use about 10% less of it than Humalog.

All things you should discuss with your doctor of course.

Ron

Not a med prof. Just diabetic type 2 on Prandin, Levemir, ramipril, bisoprolol, & Crestor. Diag. Feb/01.

"I have not failed. I have just found 10,000 ways that don't work." - Thomas Edison

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JoyceL replied on Fri, Sep 11 2009 8:23 AM

Have you talked to your son's doctor?  He may be the best source to knoow whether your sonis ready to start pump therapy.

Joyce

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