Dexcom Seven CGM

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Axel posted on Tue, Sep 22 2009 12:49 AM

I am considering obtaining a Dexcom Seven CGM and am wondering if any one has any experience with the device?

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Answered (Verified) rellajeff replied on Tue, Nov 16 2010 8:27 AM
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I have been using the DexThing for about 3 months.  I do like the device but there are some issues with it and probably with others.  Comparing the Dex with the MiniMed I found that the MM sensors are more expensive and last for three days.  The Dex is cheaper and lasts almost a week.

The Dex varies in how well it monitors sugar.  Some sets have worked pretty well for most of the week.  The first day is variable but then it settles down.  The results are usually good to 20% which isn't too bad since the glucose monitors are only good to 10%.  Some sets have not worked well at all and I have "ripped them out!".  Mostly it is a good indicator of highs and lows.  Trends are also evident.  But to not bolus unless you do a meter stick first.  I have seen sporadic readings off by as much as 100%!

All in all it is a good product that will only get better as the technology matures.  It will soon be paired with the Animas pump in a single unit.  The Animas pump has some issues for me (lots!) and I liked my old MiniMed a lot better.  Hopefully, the new Animas device will correct its many usability problems.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Jeff

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Answered (Not Verified) bonbon replied on Tue, Sep 29 2009 6:12 PM
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I started using the CGM in July and I absolutely LOVE it!  I was diagnosed with type I in April 2007 and found it hard to figure out what my glucose levels were doing and getting them regulated.  The CGM makes this sooooo much easier for me.  It's helped me bring my A1C down from 7.3% to around 6%.  It has saved me so many times to avoid lows, especially at night when the alarm wakes me up.

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bernfarr replied on Tue, Nov 17 2009 7:24 AM

I started on the Dexcom STS in March 2007. I'm now using the Dexcom Seven plus. I love it, and my wife also loves how she can check my blood sugar on long drives just by pushing a button.

Learning to use a CGM takes time. My advice, first get a 1-2 week trial of any CGM you're considering (Dexcom, Navigator, Medtronic). Until you've tried one out you can't tell whether it will work for you. In the case of the Dexcom, it's accuracy depends on what you use to calibrate it. I changed from an Ultra meter, which used to be the only meter that worked with the Dexcom, to a WaveSense Jazz and my A1c went down by 0.5.

When I started on the Dexcom my A1c was running about 8.2. My most recent one was 6.8. I think at least half of this is due to the Dexcom.

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Andrew replied on Tue, Mar 9 2010 11:07 AM

Based on your glowing review of the Dexcom Seven plus I went to there site and could not figure out what was involved in using the system. Can you answer a couple of questions?

1. I am assuming you put a sensor under your skin and need to replace the sensor on a regular basis. How much are the sensors and how often do you replace them?

2. You mention calibrating the system. How often do you need to calibrate. And on a similar vein how often do you take a blood sample to monitor you blood sugar. 

A little about me. I have had diabetes for over 50 years. I monitor my blood sugar about 9 times daily with a meter and what you said about checking your blood while driving echoes with my wife and myself.

Andrew

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bonbon replied on Tue, Mar 9 2010 11:42 AM

Andrew,   Here are some answers for your questions:

There is a sensor that I wear on my belly that sticks on my skin similar to a patch and on the underside of it is a small wire (about 1/2 inch long) that gets inserted under the skin.  I change the patch once a week.  It's pretty easy to insert after you've done in a few times.  There is a small transmitter that I attach to each patch that transmits the readings to the monitor.  The sensors run about $60 apiece but my insurance pays for all but $15 apiece. 

The sensor alerts me every 12 hours to calibrate it.  This is done by testing my glucose with my glucose meter/test strips, then I input the number into the Dexcom meter.  At any time during the day if I think my Dexcom meter is off I can retest with my test strips and enter the number in the Dexcom.  I rarely have to do this extra calibrating.

Before I got my own Dexcom I tested one from my doctor's office for a week to see if it was something I liked.  You can usually rent one for free to try it out before you buy one...just ask your doctor or endocrinologist.

Hope this helps!

 

Bonbon

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Andrew replied on Tue, Mar 9 2010 11:48 AM

Thanks for the quick response. Your answer was very helpful.

 

Andrew

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Answered (Verified) rellajeff replied on Tue, Nov 16 2010 8:27 AM
Verified by Axel

I have been using the DexThing for about 3 months.  I do like the device but there are some issues with it and probably with others.  Comparing the Dex with the MiniMed I found that the MM sensors are more expensive and last for three days.  The Dex is cheaper and lasts almost a week.

The Dex varies in how well it monitors sugar.  Some sets have worked pretty well for most of the week.  The first day is variable but then it settles down.  The results are usually good to 20% which isn't too bad since the glucose monitors are only good to 10%.  Some sets have not worked well at all and I have "ripped them out!".  Mostly it is a good indicator of highs and lows.  Trends are also evident.  But to not bolus unless you do a meter stick first.  I have seen sporadic readings off by as much as 100%!

All in all it is a good product that will only get better as the technology matures.  It will soon be paired with the Animas pump in a single unit.  The Animas pump has some issues for me (lots!) and I liked my old MiniMed a lot better.  Hopefully, the new Animas device will correct its many usability problems.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Jeff

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I recommend that all users of the Dexcom CGM look at the Dexcom Users Group on tudiabetes.com. There are approximately 400 members in the group and there is very good information given there. I started using the Dexcom in January,2010 and I love it.

My health insurance plan has changed, and it looks like my Dexcom and supplies will no longer be covered. I stopped using it in early October and I am saving the sensors for travel, and situations where the CGM is most helpful. My sensors last an average of two weeks. Many users agree that the accuracy is better during the second week than during the first.

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Axel replied on Wed, Nov 17 2010 12:21 AM

Thanks for your response to my query. Since I made the request for information I obtained a Dexcom System 7. In five months of using the Dexcom CGM my A1c has gone from 9.4 to 7.1. I have learned so much about how my body reacts to insulin, various foods and various exercise. I learned that my insulin resistance changes during the day. At breakfast I use one unit of Novalog for 2 grams of carb. At lunch I use one unit for 6 grams of carb. At dinner I use one unit for 10 grams of carb.

I have had some of the same issues with the sensors. I  had one fail after 2 days. However that said, I have had a number of sensors last 15 days. The good thing is that Dexcom will replace a sensor that has failed within the 7 day guarantee period at no charge and a new replacement sensor so you have it in just two days.

By the way the FDA requirements for glucomator accuracy is +/- 20%. The same spec applies to CGMs. There are some other requirements that I don't remember.

Regards

Axel

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