Doctor Care

rated by 0 users
Not Answered This post has 0 verified answers | 7 Replies | 2 Followers

Not Ranked
1 Posts
Gwenn posted on Fri, Feb 12 2010 4:07 PM

I am new to this site so I am really not sure if I am posting this question to the correct board.

In my 25ish years of being diagnosed with T1 I have had two doctors.  I have not been happy with either.  My first doctor I would see only once a year.  I finally refused to go to him because all he did was change everything the nurse and I worked out.  The doctor I am going to now I thought was going to be fantastic because I had heard so many good things about her.  I have been going to her for several years now and have only met her on my first visit when she poked her head in to introduce herself.

Diabetics are their main care giver and I do take good care of myself.  I only go to the "doctor" which is the nurse every three months to get my A1C, but I am really getting irritated with it that my insurance is paying for the doctor when all I am seeing is the nurse.  I am not sure the doctor could do any more, but it is the principal.

A friend told me this morning that by law the doctor has to see the patient at least every other time.  When I asked if this was a TX law or if it was a National law, she didn't know.  My question is how often should I be seeing the doctor? 

 

All Replies

Top 10 Contributor
Female
384 Posts
jen1229 replied on Fri, Feb 12 2010 5:09 PM

My PCP is in private practice and I see him every time I go. When I went to the Joslin i was assigned to an endo whom I saw each time I went.  I didn't like the first endo, so I changed to another.  If I was paying (or my insurance was paying)  and  the doctor wouln'n see me, that would be the last time.  I'd find another doc.  How good can she be when she never sees you.  And when she is not seeing you, what is she doing?  When I go to a doctor I want to see a doctor and not a nurse or nurse practiioner, or physician's assitant. 

Jen  - LevemirConfused and Novalog Wink A1c 5.8

 

 

Top 10 Contributor
173 Posts
zrebiec replied on Sat, Feb 13 2010 11:48 AM

At the Joslin Clinic we routinely rotate the appointments between the endocrinologist and the nurse practitioner who work together as a team.

 

John Zrebiec, MSW, CDE

Moderator 

Top 10 Contributor
Female
140 Posts
shortie replied on Sun, Feb 14 2010 5:06 PM

I agree with you.  I am seeing my endo once a year, my regular doctor every 6 months and I see them , not a NP or PA.  However, if I got in sick ( which I did 2 years ago) I was assigned my doctor's PA  for that appt only, and that was fine with me.

I remember one time years ago when my husband was having a pain in his chest ( he had a stroke a few years before) , his appt was with a PA and she was training another person.  I was very unhappy with the way the appt was proceeding, so I asked if my husband's doctor could come in for a few minutes!!!!!!  He did.  He sent us to the ER !!!! Actually he walked us down there.  The outcome was okay but I think one must use their common sense at times.    A scheduled appt should be with a doctor....a last minute call in appt for sickness can be with a PA but one must make sure is it going they way it should....

Shortie

Top 10 Contributor
Female
384 Posts
jen1229 replied on Mon, Feb 15 2010 7:15 PM

Hi Shortie:

A few years back I suddenly came down with a fever.  I called the doctor's office and he was not there so I spoke wht the PA.  She asked me what my temp was and I said I didn't know, that I didn't have a thermometer.  She told me to go home and take my temp and call her back.  Mind you home was 30 minutes away, and the doctor's office was five minutes away.  So shaking and shivering I drove home, took my temp which was 104.3 and called the doctor back. This time I told the secretary that I wated him to call me back I wouldn't talk to the PA.  he called me back and told me to go to the ER.  I had taken tylenol twice and the temp did not go down.  so off to the ER I went.  They poked an d prodded and did every conceivable test they could think of and at 2:00 AM I was admitted.  The next morning My leg was swollen, red and very sore.  I had cellulitis.  So that is my PA story and why I refuse to see any one but my doctor.

Jen  - LevemirConfused and Novalog Wink A1c 5.8

 

 

Top 10 Contributor
Male
432 Posts
Ron AKA replied on Wed, Feb 17 2010 1:15 AM

I am not totally convinced on the need to see an endocrinologist frequently, unless there are some unusual issues with your diabetes management program. I just see my family doctor once every 3 months. He reviews my lab results, prescribes meds for another 3 months, and gives me a lab requisition for the next set of tests to be done just before the next 3 month appointment.

Regulations may be different in the US, but here in Canada only a doctor can prescribe medication and make lab requisitions. This seems to work for me, as I get to see a doctor every 3 months and discuss any issues that need to be addressed.

Ron

Not a med prof. Just diabetic type 2 on Prandin, Levemir, ramipril, bisoprolol, & Crestor. Diag. Feb/01.

"I have not failed. I have just found 10,000 ways that don't work." - Thomas Edison

Top 10 Contributor
Female
384 Posts
jen1229 replied on Wed, Feb 17 2010 7:42 AM

Ron AKA:
Regulations may be different in the US, but here in Canada only a doctor can prescribe medication and make lab requisitions. This seems to work for me, as I get to see a doctor every 3 months and discuss any issues that need to be addressed.

Hi Ron: 

I have the same schedule with my primary care doc as you do.  I went to the Joslin for a while when I first was going on meds and then again when I went on insulin. 

The rules are different here in the US.  A Nurse Practitioner or Physicians Assistant can prescribe medication when working under the auspices of a physician.  I personally feel, as I think I said before, if I am paying for a doctor, I want to see a doctor.

Jen  - LevemirConfused and Novalog Wink A1c 5.8

 

 

Top 500 Contributor
Female
2 Posts
dana replied on Thu, Feb 18 2010 2:16 AM

Jen,

I can understand your frustration.  Here in Texas there is no requirement that your doctor see you - a  PA or Nurse Practioner can see you in place of the doctor.  I had a wonderful Nurse Practioner working under the doctor I had been using for about 15 years when I got my diabetes diagnosis.  I saw her every 3 months for 5 years, then she left the practice.  Finding a replacement has been somewhat difficult.  Twice after going through the whole interviewing doctors rountine I found doctors I liked and who agreed to work with me, only to have one leave the state and another leave her practice.   The next doctor was a total disaster.  I do suggest you interview a doctor before taking them on.  Ask questions, explain your philosophy on your diabetes and see if they agree and are willing to work with you.  I have my A1C test done before I see my doctor every 3 months - some doctors don't like that - but it makes no sense to me to see the doctor without those results.  I see diabetes as a marathon not a sprint.  I keep my A1C under 7.0, but I'm not going to change my meds to get it any lower.  I know drug companies are using extrapalations of the two long term studies on diabetes complications, but the actual studies found that 7.0 was the target.  You can extrapulate all you want that if 7.0 is good, 6.5 must be better - until there is a study to show that is the case, I stick to 7.0 as my goal. 

Dana

Page 1 of 1 (8 items) | RSS