Cold cereals and BG

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jen1229 replied on Tue, Aug 23 2011 11:27 AM

I didn't know this.  It is veryinteresting.  Generally the only carbs I eat are an English muffin at breakfast, maybe some crackers, but mostly veggies and protein.  Maybe I need to eat more carbs.

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SydneyWils replied on Thu, Aug 25 2011 12:35 AM

Hot oatmeal, choice of cold cereal or house-made granola with fresh berries or bananas, skim milk and your choice of toast, bagel or muffin.

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carlz03 replied on Mon, Jan 9 2012 4:55 AM

Fiber is good for our health. It can helps us in the proper digestion of our foods taken. We can get those fibers in oatmeal products sold in the groceries and also in the fruits specially those fresh fruits. But I got confused when my doctor told me not to eat too much fibrous foods. Someone knows the right explanation for that?

 

 

 

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Camilla replied on Sun, Feb 5 2012 11:45 AM

Cereals, milk, bananas - all bad news for a diabetic. Cereals are usually 85% or over carbohydrate. This kind of breakfast is guaranteed to raise any diabetic's blood sugar uncontrollably. Eggs or any proteins are the best alternative and far more filling.

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amrad replied on Tue, Feb 7 2012 11:00 PM

I have cereal (special K) and milk for breakfast, and don't notice an uncontrolled blood sugar. At the end of 3 hrs it is back to normal. Of course I only have a cup of cereal, and a cup of milk.

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kimcarter replied on Wed, Feb 8 2012 12:17 AM

As we all know that fiber help our digestive system. It helps the system to digest the foods that we eat and also our metabolism. Cold cereals and BG are good for our body for it helps maintain our appetite and diet.

 

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Cathy replied on Wed, Feb 8 2012 4:44 AM

Hi Phil,

I am a mum of a 15 year old boy whose had type 1 for 13 years. Generally cereal is a nightmare for him - even the low GI ones as he always spikes upwards 2 hours after eating it. Except for porridge which makes him go low & feel hungry 2 hours later. Lately we have tried natural museli (ie NOT toasted) with not much added sugar and greek yoghurt (which has about 1/2 carb values to regular yoghurt) - a great result! Don't forget though to deduct any grams of fiber from your total carb values!!

I think a protein breakfast would also be good for your levels - although take care with fatty meat (bacon) you may need to dual wave bolus.

Cathy from Sydney Australia

 

 

 

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I found so much interest on topics like this one. I'm a health conscious person and topics like this really are valuable to me. It simply adds ideas and tips on how to be healthy through the food that you take. It is one form of being a disciplined person.

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ken hanly replied on Thu, Jun 21 2012 11:54 AM

 I usually have oatmeal with fruit and milk for breakfast. I do not find that I have serious spikes as a result. Of course BG goes up afterwards. My average is well below the target 7 (Canadian system) From time to time I have a bowl of cold cereal with fruit for variety. I always look at labels and choose cold cereals with not too much sugar. I am just turning 80 so I think I will just keep on as I am doing. I walk and put seven to ten miles on an exercise bike each day. I think that helps.

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To all you wrote:

Everyone's response to different foods is different.  Many people find that cold cereals tend to spike glucose values, but this isn't true for everybody.  Having healthy fat and protein with easily digestible carbohydrates such as cereal can help reduce the rate of glucose rise.  It is also important not to overly limit your choices in order to keep the diet interesting and enjoyable.   Checking after meals will help you decide if a modification in dietary components, an increase in physical activity or change in medication type, strenght or timing is in order.

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