August 2010 Paper on 50-Year Medalist Study

rated by 0 users
This post has 9 Replies | 4 Followers

Top 50 Contributor
Male
Posts 50
tomjef Posted: Thu, Aug 19 2010 5:00 PM

Last week, the prestigious journal, Diabetes, published a paper "Residual Insulin Production and Pancreatic Beta Cell Turnover After 50 Years of Diabetes: Joslin Medalist Study". Of course, the lead author is Hillary Keenan, and she was accompanied by several other Joslin researchers and one non-Joslin person. You will find more info at

http://www.joslin.org/news/ultimate_diabetes_survivors_the_joslin_50-year_medalists_give_clues_to_cures.html.

I haven't found a free link to the published paper, but Hillary provided me with a link to the paper as it was submitted, and I have to say the results are exciting to me, as one of the 50-Year Medalists in the study. Dr. King says it opens a new direction for research.

Tom Beatson

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 173
zrebiec replied on Fri, Aug 20 2010 7:43 AM

Tom,

Thanks for posting the link.

John Zrebiec, MSW, CDE

Joslin Moderator

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 3
ChristieC replied on Thu, Oct 14 2010 12:57 AM

Good evening Mr. Beatson,

I read an article last week entitled "Study Confirms that Insulin-Producing Cells Can Live On in People with Type 1 Diabetes" in part referring to Medalist showing signs of existing c-peptides in their pancreas all the while living with this disease without complications. This may be the same article you are referring to above. It gave me hope and a desire to contact the Medalists to find out "how you did it" for lack of better words.

Our 15 year old son was diagnosed with Type 1 in March of this year. While he has adjusted very well and takes care of himself superbly and without complaint, I am hoping to glean some nuggets of advise from you, a Medalist yourself, of what he can do to help himself live a long uncomplicated life. Any suggestions?

Thank you & blessings to you,

Christie

Top 50 Contributor
Male
Posts 50
tomjef replied on Thu, Oct 14 2010 1:36 PM

Hi Christie,

Your message arrived on a bad day for me, because we have at least four people from Joslin here in Phoenix for a reception this evening. Both Dr. Laffel and Dr. Keenan will speak. I am meeting Nevart from the Development Office in less than a half hour. I will reply to your questions on Saturday, hopefully.

Tom

Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 55
AnnetteUK replied on Thu, Oct 14 2010 4:26 PM

Exciting to me also Tom!! What a fantastic journey we medalist are in.... can you believe it?

I had the call back to Joslin as Dr King thought I was producing 'some' insulin still!!

I almost fell off my chair hearing that!!  If only our parents new about this ride we are on :)Yes

See you again next Spring in Boston (Y)

~Annette~

Top 50 Contributor
Male
Posts 50
tomjef replied on Sat, Oct 16 2010 2:43 PM

This is a picture of Dr. Hillary Keenan and me, after Hillary received the yellow jersey for winning the Beatson Challenge. The challenge was the idea of Michael Sullivan, Executive VP of Development at Joslin, with the winner being the first researcher at Joslin to get a paper published about their research on a project that was a beneficiary of my contribution. Michael focused it on the yellow jersey of the Tour de France bicycle race because of my long standing interest in bicycle riding.

Top 50 Contributor
Male
Posts 50
tomjef replied on Sat, Oct 16 2010 7:00 PM

The jersey was designed by Nevart Hamamjian of the Joslin Development Office.

Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 55
AnnetteUK replied on Sat, Oct 16 2010 7:38 PM

Tom.... may I just say thank you for your being who you are... and what you do to help researchers

do what they can to discover the cure or prevention for children.. so no more will have to live their whole

life with J/D as you and other Medalists have.

You rock... and I admire you so.

Would love to have gone on bike rides with you... being a Brit thats how I got to & from school then to and from

work in England. A super excercise!!

Bless you Tom...    ~Annette~

Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 55
AnnetteUK replied on Sat, Oct 16 2010 7:40 PM

Love the shirts... and seeing who are wearing them!!!!!!!

Well done Nevart!!

Top 50 Contributor
Male
Posts 50
tomjef replied on Sat, Oct 16 2010 7:56 PM

ChristieC:

Good evening Mr. Beatson,

I read an article last week entitled "Study Confirms that Insulin-Producing Cells Can Live On in People with Type 1 Diabetes" in part referring to Medalist showing signs of existing c-peptides in their pancreas all the while living with this disease without complications. This may be the same article you are referring to above. It gave me hope and a desire to contact the Medalists to find out "how you did it" for lack of better words.

Our 15 year old son was diagnosed with Type 1 in March of this year. While he has adjusted very well and takes care of himself superbly and without complaint, I am hoping to glean some nuggets of advise from you, a Medalist yourself, of what he can do to help himself live a long uncomplicated life. Any suggestions?

Thank you & blessings to you,

Christie

First, a word about complications. My background retinopathy started about 46 years ago. Fortunately, it remained in the background until about 5 years ago, allowing for the introduction of laser treatment long before I needed it. I haven't had to deal with kidney problems or neuropathy problems.

For the meals I eat at home I use a gram scale to weigh the things that don't come in labeled packages, so I can get a pretty accurate carb count. I live in a retirement community that provides dinner in the dining room, so I estimate the carbs for that, and it's working pretty well. I started using an insulin pump about 15 years ago. My Cozmo stopped working about 3 months ago, so I have just recently started using an Animas Ping. I have had much better control with insulin pumps than I had with injections.

I didn't start getting serious about exercise until about 35 years ago. I walked every evening for about a half hour. Then I started riding the bicycle, always on the road, never stationary. I gave up the walking and rode my bike 2 or 3 days a week. I rode 10,000 miles in 1991, and currently do about 1500 miles a year.

My philosophy has been to take one day at a time, and do what's necessary to take care of today, with whatever variations that come with it. I've been retired for 24 years, so that doesn't match up very well with what your son needs.

I believe there are some T1D who have good genes otherwise, who take good care of themselves and get 50-Year medals, and there are other T1D whose genes aren't so good for long life, and they don't reach the 50 year mark, even if they do take good care of themselves.

Page 1 of 1 (10 items) | RSS