Proper meal plan

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dpalmer posted on Mon, Dec 27 2010 10:27 PM

I am trying to get better control of my diabetes and health and was curious as to a daily proper meal plan.  I am an active 185 lb 6ft male, how many carbs/calories and protein should i be consuming a day? breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks?  any help would be greatly appreciated!

 

Thank you

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Madman replied on Tue, Dec 28 2010 9:57 AM

are you type 1 or type 2?

Insulin or oral meds or D&E controlled?

Have you met with a CDE or RD?

Personally, I follow something that resembles the Zone diet.  Its low enough in carbs that my meals don't cause huge spikes, and high enough in protein and vegetables to be a healthy diet. 

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dpalmer replied on Tue, Dec 28 2010 10:36 AM

I am type one and on the insulin pump

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jen1229 replied on Wed, Dec 29 2010 6:54 AM

Have you consulted a Registered Dietitian? Preferably one who is a Certified Diabetes Educator.  They can help you to figure out how many carbs you should have for each meal and snack and help you to devise a meal plan incorporating the foods you like to eat.  I am type II but y dietitian helped me tremendously in the beginning. When I get off track I pull out the paperwork she gave me and start over again. 

Hope this helps.

Jen  - LevemirConfused and Novalog Wink A1c 5.8

 

 

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Dear dpalmer:

I would agree with Jen1229.  I admit to bias, being a dietitian and CDE but working with a dietitian can help you not only keep your blood sugars in good control but  also help you develop an all around healthy meal plan.  Most insurance companies pay for nutrition services.  Inquire of your health care provider or you can go onto the American Dietetic Assocation's web site at eatright.org and use their locator to find a dietitian in your area specializing in diabetes.

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RobertIA replied on Wed, Dec 29 2010 3:09 PM

Thank you Nora,

Unless they specialize in diabetes is the key.  If we don't want to hear words like "just stop eating sugar", and get loaded up on carbs, stay away from those that don't specialize in diabetes.   The word certified means they should have the extra knowledge.  I have dealt with several that were not certified, and they had more common sense than a couple that were so overly impressed with their title that once they got passed explaining how good they were, they could not put together a coherent sentence. 

Type 2 (10/2003)   Lantus and Novalog   Now added Metformin      Retired

 

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Posted By: Health essay

I admit to bias, being a dietitian and CDE but working with a dietitian can help you not only keep your blood sugars in good control but  also help you develop an all around healthy meal plan.  Inquire of your health care provider or you can go onto the American Dietetic Assocation's web site at eatright.org and use their locator to find a dietitian in your area specializing in diabetes. Its low enough in carbs that my meals don't cause huge spikes, and high enough in protein and vegetables to be a healthy diet. Most insurance companies pay for nutrition services.

Top 25 Contributor
78 Posts

Dear dpalmer,

The total amount of carbohydrate you need a day is dependent on the type of diabetes you have, you ht and weight (which you have provided), how you eat and the amount of activity you engage in her day.   As a quick beginning -on average between 60 and 75 grams of carbohydrate per meal.  If you have snacks take away some from the meal totals.

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