Has Anyone had success in managing T2 with nutrition and exercise instead of drugs?

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kemet Posted: Sun, Apr 10 2011 11:30 PM

Hi, I am looking to find others who have had success in managing T2 with diet and exercise instead of drugs. I have read that several medical doctors are now turning to diet to help manage diabetes. Anyone tried this? What were the results?

Thanks!

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RobertIA replied on Mon, Apr 11 2011 12:21 AM

kemet,

There are many people that are managing diabetes with exercise and diet and many many fewer that can do it only with diet.   This blogger writes about his ups and downs and has been doing exercise and diet for over 10 years.  The URL for his blog is  http://www.notmedicatedyet.com/blog/blog.html .

Type 2 (10/2003)   Lantus and Novalog   Now added Metformin      Retired

 

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Tor replied on Mon, Apr 11 2011 1:52 PM

I've been doing it for 13 years, ever since I picked up my first prescription for Metformin and took the time to read about the potential side effects of that medication.

It hasn't been easy, in fact managing my health has been a major part of my life during those years. It involves gaining general information about my condition as well as monitoring my particular status at any given time, researching various dietary options and finding affordable sources for the foodstuffs needed, adapting activity/exercise to the time of year and weather on any given day, and cultivating and keeping in touch with my PHCT (Personal Health Care Team) which includes a GP, herbalist, dietician, wellness counsellor, a hemotologist, an endocrinologist and a cardiologist.

Despite the hard work it's all been very rewarding. My blood sugar levels are still well controlled despite dire predictions and warnings about diabetes being a 'progressive disease that makes self-management impossible over time' (doesn't have to be, from my experience),  Thanks to the improvements I have done to my general health, and as a result of taking control of my diabetes I survived a cardiac arrest and near death experience last year, and am optimistic about being able to enjoy years of retirement. (THAT was not a given at the time when I was diagnosed.)

For the record, the winning combination I found was a diet based on low Glycemic Index carbs, lots of fiber and fish and a regime of walking immediately after each meal, in order to kick start my metabolism. However, I respect that people's likes and dislikes, and the nature and degree of their diabetes, calls for individualized solutions.  In some cases the solution might not be either/or but a combination of a healthy diet, moderate exercise and medications as needed.

Tor

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strdau replied on Tue, Apr 12 2011 6:49 PM

Hi, I would like to build a team to support me.  I live in a small town on the east side of the state.  I am more than willing to travel to the Seattle area for a good dr/dietician/nutritionist.  I just need a place to start.  Not sure how to pick a new dr.  I believe nutrition is the solution along with regular exercise.  I appreciate your comments about what works for you.  It takes courage to put it out there for people to comment on.

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cindy replied on Wed, Apr 13 2011 3:37 PM

i have tryed it but it did not work for me but here must be a way that we can manage the diabetes

cindy ann leon

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cindy replied on Wed, Apr 13 2011 3:40 PM

to should move to nevada because there is some good doctors here and lots of places to work out at.

cindy ann leon

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Dear Strdau:

You can find a dietitian by going to the American Dietetic Association web site: eatright.org and searching by both location and speciality.

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nance replied on Wed, Apr 13 2011 9:47 PM

kemet:

Hi, I am looking to find others who have had success in managing T2 with diet and exercise instead of drugs. I have read that several medical doctors are now turning to diet to help manage diabetes. Anyone tried this? What were the results?

Thanks!

The "and exercise" part is crucial.  I think it would be very difficult (if not impossible) to totally control diabetes with just diet alone.  Even the smallest amount of the very healthiest and best food is not going to make blood sugar go down.  But exercise will.  And if you exercise often enough, and to the extent required by your metabolism, it can go a long way in controlling diabetes.  It worked for me for 11 years without meds.  I only had to start metformin recently because with my increased fitness level, it made it harder to get heart rate up enough and long enough to be able to continue controlling with just diet and exercise.  It's the exertion which gets the heart rate up that also gets the blood sugar down and helps keep it in control.  Daily exercise is still the biggest part of my blood sugar management.  What's your daily exercise plan?  Are you prepared to build on it as you go along, increase your fitness level, and possibly lose weight?  Have you discussed your goals with your doctor?

Nance, T2 dx 7/98; diet and exercise/no meds 11 yrs; 500mg Glucophage XR 4/day, 5mg Glucotrol XL 3/day; A1c av. in 6s.  Treadmill, elliptical, biking, Arc trainer, dumbbells, other resistance moves -- 30-60 minutes a day.

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strdau replied on Thu, Apr 14 2011 2:39 PM

Great suggestion - thanks. 

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Misty800 replied on Sat, May 26 2012 6:51 PM

I have been controlling T2 with diet & exercise for the past 12 years, no meds.

The last two years has been "diet only" due to feet, knee, & hip problems that do not allow me to use the treadmill,  glider,  recumbent bike or just walk other than to and fro in the house.

The secret is to eat very low carb foods, limit or almost omit starch foods, weigh and measure foods to ensure normal servings instead of heaping plateful your appetite is crying for.

Test 2 hours after meals to help determine what foods do to your blood sugar. Adjust choice of food and or serving size accordingly in order to keep blood sugar down.

My A1c has been holding the last 2 years at 5.5.

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mrfino replied on Wed, May 30 2012 5:06 PM

Misty: With the health problems what DO you do for exercise?

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DaffyD2 replied on Wed, Jun 13 2012 12:29 PM

I was diagnosed over a year ago with T2 and my family physician wanted me take Metformin.  I wanted to try to manage my diabetes with diet and exercise alone, so I decided to see an endocrinologist.  Where my family doctor was quick to have me medicate, my endocrinologist agreed with my weight loss/lifestyle change plan - in fact, she insisted that this was the best way to take control of my diabetes.  I was really overweight, so I started the diabetic meal plan right away and lost 75lbs in the first 9 months.  I have continued on the meal plan, have added more time exercising, and as a result I have been able to maintain my weight.  My AC1 has been in the normal range for 9 months, my triglycerides came way down along with my LDL, my HDL is also in the normal range, and my goal is to never have to medicate.  

Cool

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DaffyD2 replied on Wed, Jun 13 2012 12:34 PM

I began with very simple exercises such as walking a block (which I initially found painful and left me out of breath) and increased this as my weight went down.  Although I still have back and joint pain, it is much less severe and I am able to walk everywhere without losing my breath and keeping my heart rate up.  I have even begun to do other aerobic exercises for my core, which has increased my strength and built up my muscles, so I am so much less physically restricted than before.  

Cool

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Misty800 replied on Mon, Jun 25 2012 10:08 PM

mrfino:

I do "nothing" for exercise to control BS or weight except controlling what goes on the plate at mealtimes.

I do not sit all the time in front of TV or computer, I am up and about slowly  walking around in the house even tho it is in pain most of the time. Housework is done a little here and a little there as I can, it does eventually get done. It hurts to sit, to stand, and to walk. Had to sleep on my back for past 2 years.

Major surgery on both shoulders a year apart kept my upper body restricted as far as areobic execrise goes (recovery time for this type surgery is 1 year each , last one done last August). Then debilitating hip bursitis and knee/feet pain reduced what the lower half was able to do. Shoulder exercises do not work for BS control or weight, does help regain use of shoulders, mobility, and strengthening.

This past week I was brought to my knees and cried "uncle" for help and had steroid injections in both hips and will have injections in both knees soon. Could not get both at same time since it would be an overload of steroid. Orthopedic specialist says the bursitis and knee pain is due to a problem in my back. When I was 13 a 26 year old male (brother-in-law at the time) shoved me backward on a dining table in anger and I heard my back cracking. I have had back problems since  then (I am 77 now). I  started physical therapy last week and hopefully therapy will help in returning to normal and ability to exercise again.

You can see why "diet" is my only method of control for BS at the present time.

Recently I had positional vertigo,  cataract surgeries last December, and now Laser surgeries on both eyes for secondary cataracts , more than a boat load of miseries added. I will win my battles and be back whole soon!! At present I just smile and keep on doing the best I can! No, this is not a pity party, just facts of my life at the moment~!

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