New Hope for diabetic nephropathy

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SPAM again!

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amrad replied on Wed, Aug 8 2012 10:00 PM

they should delete these users from the system

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Tor replied on Fri, Aug 10 2012 7:33 PM

My understanding of the word spam in the context of internet forums is that it describes postings that are a) irrelevant to the topic of the forum and/or b) shamelessly and fraudulently promote a commercial product in an attempt to cheat somebody out of their money. The above posting is drawing attention to alternative (Chinese) treatment methods for diabetic neuropathy but hardly fits the 'spam' definitions.

Tor

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RobertIA replied on Fri, Aug 10 2012 8:17 PM

Thanks for the clarification Tor.  I have been trying to get my thoughts around this since it was first posted.  Many forums would delete the two word post as spam because too many people do this just to raise their posting numbers. 

With the "report abuse" under the MORE tab - second item down - there is not a need to call attention to it in a post.  Calling attention to it in the "report abuse" area means that the message will be seen by a moderator and can be responded to if there is a need.

Type 2 (10/2003)   Lantus and Novalog   Now added Metformin      Retired

 

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momcat4g replied on Sat, Aug 11 2012 7:52 AM

Thanks for the clarification and the slap on the wrist. I find these postings annoying (don't read them anymore), and the "real" posters don't seem to find any reason to post.

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Tor replied on Sun, Aug 12 2012 1:03 AM

Damage to nervecells resulting from longterm exposure to high bloodsugar levels has always been a topic of interest to diabetics. Generally the accepted scientific truth has been that the body is not capable of replacing dead or damaged nerve cells, including brain cells, once the damage has occurred. I'd like to share some of my personal experiences in this area.

More than 30 years ago when I was an undergraduate studying psychology at the University of Oslo in Norway, I became a single dad for an eight month old girl, following a marriage at young age and subsequent divorce. My daughter was born completely deaf in one ear and with a 70 percent hearing loss in the other, due to her mother having had german measles during pregnancy.  When my daughter was one year old the nurse at the local health clinic said it was time she was fitted with hearing aids. I was surprised, given that kids don't normally start talking until they are a few years old. So I asked one of the profs teaching at my faculty what the point would be of fitting a baby with a hearing aid.

He answered that the point was that the brain has an amazing ability to redirect wiring and connections, in order to assign underused parts of the brain to other functions in need of extra brain power. He said that was why we often hear about persons born blind who have an incredible sense of touch, smell or hearing, and likewise deaf born people who have amazing eyesight. So in other words, if a small child doesn't have a hearing aid that would continue to stimulate the hearing part of the brain, that part of the brain might get reassigned to other tasks, making later advances in hearing aid technology less useful.

The second time I heard of this was when reading one of Dr. Bernstein's books about diabetes management. He was convinced that even someone with severe diabetic neuropathy in the feet or hands could heal, if they achieved and maintained good blood sugar control. Also there the explanation was that given a chance, our body would rewire nerve connections to make up for the ones that had been damaged.

Last but not least I had a personal experience in this area. In early January of 2010 I was waiting at a bus stop. The next thing I knew I woke up in a hospital bed with tubes coming out all over the place, total amnesia for the preceeding year, and a calendar telling me that it was mid February. It turned out that I had suffered a sudden and full cardiac arrest at the bus stop, and had technically been dead for over five minutes before a passing stranger gave me CPR until the ambulance  arrived. After being released from hospital I was at a rehabilitation centre for several months before being told that I had permanent brain damage and could never ever work again, having to rely on disability.

Two months ago my doctor cleared me to look for work after tests of my cognitive abilities showed an improvement from a score of 27 out of 100 two years ago to 76 out of 100 now. During these two years I've been keeping my brain challenged with reading, with learning a new skill (database management) and organizing thousands of photos I've taken over the years. And not least, I've kept up my routine of walking several times a day for a total of two hours a day, and sticking to a mealplan focused on low GI carbs.

Anyhow, to get to the point, your body often has amazing abilities at recovery when given a chance. Meaning that even for a longtime out of control diabetic with signs of neuropathy, it's never too late to turn over a new leaf and stop, and quite likely reverse, much of the damage that's been done.

Tor

 

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It seems that the answer to many questions is "achieve and maintain good blood sugar control". Well...what if you cannot control blood sugar? Then...what?

 

 

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floydf replied on Mon, Aug 20 2012 2:10 AM

How do you control your blood sugar? medication? diet? level of control? length of time diabetic?

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Tor replied on Wed, Aug 22 2012 9:22 PM

The first and quite important step is frequent blood sugar testing, especially after eating, exercise and other things that influence blood sugar levels.

The second is to watch what you eat, it is easier to avoid blood sugar spikes than it is to bring them down once they've happened. Remember that carbohydrates which translate into blood sugars are far more things than plain sugar -  common sources are pasta, rice, potatoes, bread and fruit/berries.

The third is activity, lots of it. Not necessarily strenuous or boring/tedious, just keep moving.

The fourth, if the above three don't do the trick, is to talk to your doctor about appropriate medications.

That's all, really.

Tor

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