One Reason For Diabetic Foot Pain

rated by 0 users
This post has 3 Replies | 1 Follower

Top 150 Contributor
Male
Posts 7
Kefren Posted: Tue, Aug 28 2012 10:43 AM

Diabetic foot pain has been attributed to neuropathy. But sometimes if you are neuropathic, i.e. not feeling anything, then why do you still get foot pain?

One of the reasons which sometimes goes amiss is the idea of infection.

If a neuropathic Diabetic is feeling foot pain then sometimes we have to dig around and figure out why. Sometimes, but not always, it is to do with something that hasn't been identified.

Infection can also be attributed to high blood sugars.

This was the case for one of our patients. They had trouble keeping their blood sugars down and for months the Doctors didn't understand why. They came to us from a simple referral. Upon clipping the big toenail (which felt soggy, looked not right and the toe was slightly red) the nail peeled off revealing a large ulceration that had been hidden underneath.

Sometimes though if you have reduced circulation issues the signs of an infection (red hot and swollen) might not be visible because those signs have been masked. Some popular drugs which also mask infection are steroids.

This is why so many professionals advise patients to monitor their own feet- so that they can identify red areas, cuts or bumps which might cause an issue later on. Diabetic footcare is actually 70% patient and 30% clinician. If there is an issue then the ratio reverses, but a clinician can only advise. They can only do so much and they rely on the patient telling them if there is an issue.

And if you are unsure, go anyway. The simplest way to protect your feet is to be vigilant. Being unsure is OK. I can guarantee that all clinicians will like it that you take care of your feet and ask questions. If they fob you off? Get a new clinician, your feet deserve more.

Get your FREE Diabetes Foot Prevention Report here: Diabetic Footcare

Top 10 Contributor
Male
Posts 137
Tor replied on Fri, Aug 31 2012 4:24 AM

One thing is identifying the problem the other is finding a remedy.

Here in Bridish Columbia in Canada the medical system used to cover foot care related to  diabetes. That included removing ingrown toenails whick often as not lead to ulcers.

The  current right wing nutters running this province have changed that. Yes, some form of footcare is still covered, for example amputations. But anything preventative is not.

I'm sure people in the US dealing with medical insurance companies have their own issues, but it would not surprise me if one of them also is problems getting support for preventative care.

Tor

Top 150 Contributor
Male
Posts 7
Kefren replied on Fri, Aug 31 2012 10:22 AM

Hi Tor

Here in Ontario Chiropody is not on OHIP but if you're part of a doctors team which has footcare (sometimes nurses with "advanced footcare" but that's another topic) then you are OK. If your doctors health team is not got funding, then it is pay as you go in the private sector. But hospitals are very expensive to run and that is slowly filtering down to the people who can do something about it. You shouldn't be going to hospital to have your toenails cut, that should be done in a local clinic- much cheaper, much more efficient and they can track and monitor you better.

Oddly enough 80% of all amputations could have been avoided, usually through teaching and monitoring of higher risk Diabetics.

We were in the private sector but chose to have the lowest prices around, but when someone has $75 in their bank account for the month, then sometimes compassion has to kick in- do you deny treatment or do you forget payment to stop further issues later if the patient didn't have care?

The worrying thing is that prevention is on the back burner a heck of a lot. Many choose to treat a problem when it occurs rather than trying to prevent an issue. That is what we did. We knew that in a couple of years an involuted nail (which has ingrown in the past) is going to become an issue (especially since Diabetes is progressive and increasing age doesn't help) so we removed the sides of the toenail (and stopped it from coming back) and prevented a more complicated issue much later. Corns, callus- they can be prevented or slowed down.

We have also advised on shoewear because we have seen red rub marks. Which are the starters of the body screaming out that there is an issue.

All the best.

 

 

Get your FREE Diabetes Foot Prevention Report here: Diabetic Footcare

Top 10 Contributor
Male
Posts 137
Tor replied on Wed, Sep 5 2012 4:34 AM

Thanks for your response.

I agree that most amputations could be avoided.

I was doing fine until I was hospitalized and later went through rehab after a cardiac arrest. BG control was not a priority then but I want to bring it back up on the radar.

I'm now 61 years old and have decided (Yes, decided...) to live until I am 90.

Should be an interesting challenge.

Tor

Page 1 of 1 (4 items) | RSS