Exercise

rated by 0 users
This post has 47 Replies | 1 Follower

Top 75 Contributor
Male
Posts 13
SgtCedar replied on Mon, Jun 22 2009 6:31 PM

I hurt my knee last Saturday while walking. I had to cut back on my walking. I went from walking at least 2 miles every day to 1 mile Sunday. Today I upped my milage to 1.5 miles. I found my knee stopped hurting as much after about two blocks. I made sure I stayed close to home in case trouble developed.

I will limit my walking to 2 miles until I am sure things are healed. I hated the reduction in activity but I figure things could be a lot worse if I continued to push my knees which already have arthritis.

Top 25 Contributor
Male
Posts 111
Jorgie replied on Tue, Jun 23 2009 8:38 AM

It sounds like you and I are in the same shape. I had a knee replacement about three years ago and now I have a cracked kneecap.Ick!

Top 75 Contributor
Male
Posts 13
SgtCedar replied on Tue, Jun 23 2009 8:24 PM

I have not needed surgery yet. I am sure it is a matter of time. I am hoping if I can lose enough weight it will take enough strain off the knees to push it way down the road.

It is funny in a way that getting a diagnosis of diabetes was needed to motivate me to get my weight under control. My doctor has been after me for years. While I was not given early retirement from the National Guard because of my weight, it was a problem way back then (about 9 years ago). I atribute success this time to two things.

I have a friend who has had diabetes for many years and she really suffers from the effects of neuropathy. I caught the diabetes early and I am determined to avoid the kinds of problems she has. She went looking for a doctor who would give her a magic pill. When one doctor told her there was no easy treatment she went to another doctor, then another, and so on.

My family doctor (the same doctor my friend goes to) and the endocrynologist agreed my family doctor could control diabetes when it is caught this early. Since I like this doctor I am sticking with him. He listens to what you say.I do not believe in magic cures.

The other reason I think I am having more success controling my weight this time is the endocrynologist set me up for diabetes education classes and with a dietitian. I have thought for years instead of just telling me to eat less and exercise more that I needed someone to tell me what to eat.

Top 75 Contributor
Male
Posts 13
SgtCedar replied on Tue, Jun 23 2009 8:45 PM

I learned something since I hurt my knee last week. I need to pay more attention to what my body is trying to tell me. My knees, which have arthritis, seem to be fine when I walk 2 miles a day. Several times a week I would walk 3 or more miles. I started noticing me knees feeling sore toward the end of the longer walks. I would just slow down for a block or so until they stopped hurting. Apparently, me knees were not telling me to slow down but to stop.

Saturday I was near the end of a 3.25 mile walk. As always I reduced me speed for a block or so. I was waiting to cross a busy intersection when I got a serious pain in my right knee and both knees felt like the were not going to hold me up. Luckily I had my hiking staff or I would have probably been lying in the middle of a busy intersection unable to get up.

After I determined I could walk as long as I went very slowly I made it home. About two hours later I went to get up out of a chair and both knees hurt much more than the first time. This time the pain did not go away.

The next day I decided to see if I could walk at all. After about 2 block sticking very close to home I found the pain went away slowly. I am now increasing my distance very slowly and taking much longer for the distance I walk. It seems like 2.5 miles is a safe distance at least until I take more weight off the knees.

I learned one other thing today when I walked. My small city has handicap ramps at all the intersections. Since my knees were already more sensitive then normal I learned it is not a good idea to stand on the ramp when waiting for a traffic light or traffic.I think that may have been one problem Saturday. I was standing on an angle watching traffic.

At least if you have arthritis or knee injuries standing on that slope seems to throw the knee out of alignment. Maybe that is only be but consider that if you walk a lot in a city.

Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 384
jen1229 replied on Wed, Jun 24 2009 8:11 AM

I have ssevee artritis in both knees and my back.  I can only walk short distances, like from my house  to the car.  Since losing forty pounds I foundthat I can nw walk from the Weight Watchers meeting to my friend's car, so the distance is incresing.  Most people who have knee problems, know, as you foundout, that there is more pressure on the knees in the downward position than the upward.  In other words, Much more pressure is put on the knees when walking down stairs than when walking up stairs.  They say that for every 10 pounds you lose it means 4 poundds of pressure is relieved.  At first this was true for me, but I've found that the more I walk the harder it is on my knees, which at the moment are qute swollen, due to a combination of arthritis and cold damp weather.

Jen  - LevemirConfused and Novalog Wink A1c 5.8

 

 

Top 25 Contributor
Male
Posts 111
Jorgie replied on Wed, Jun 24 2009 11:57 AM

Iwas having trouble sleeping due to pain from arthritis, so now I take two 8 hour Tylenol ad bedtime.

 

jorgie

Top 75 Contributor
Male
Posts 13
SgtCedar replied on Wed, Jun 24 2009 3:49 PM

You are right about up and down steps. My apartment is on the second floor of a ninteenth-century building with a store on the first floor. I often get out of breath walking up the steps but my knees normally only hurt when I go down the loooong steps.

I do not know how much weight is taken off the knees when you lose 10 pounds. I will ask my reumatologist when I see him next month. Four pounds sounds reasonable.

You never realize how uneaven the sidewalks are until your knees hurt. The city put in the wheelchair ramps a few years ago when they got money to replace all the traffic signals and street signs with overhead fixtures. While the signals and signs were all done by one company the ramps were done by several companies. I do not know how many different designs and shapes there are.

The city has a lot of shade trees. The result is many uneven walks. While the city replaces some old sidewalks they did not replace the curbs in most cases. I knew we had a lot of curbs that were not concrete but I never realized how many. Some have very durable granite curbs like old banks and some old churches but most of them are slate. The slate curbs are almost gone in most places. The sidewalks that the city redbuilt seem to have been built with a normal slope toward the street. However some owners hired a contractor to do the work rather than paying the city. If the curb was almost gone they simply put the walk at any crazy angle to meet the top of what was left of the curb.

Most people probably never realize how bad the sidewalks are. It is only those of us with arthritis or knee injuries who suffer. The good news though is today I managed to walk two miles with no pain in my knees. Big Smile It did not even take two blocks for my knees to stop being stiff.

Top 75 Contributor
Male
Posts 13
SgtCedar replied on Wed, Jun 24 2009 3:52 PM

I use the store brand it works as well and is much cheaper. I get the big bottle at Rite Aid. I am sure most major chains sell a store brand. I could not live without it.

Top 25 Contributor
Male
Posts 111
Jorgie replied on Tue, Sep 8 2009 2:48 PM

Because of some medical problems I wasn't able to work out as much as I was before. I am back to normal now and once again doing my full work out three times a week.

Top 75 Contributor
Male
Posts 13

I finally figured out why I was having pain in my knees. I saw the rheumatologist and he confirmed my conclusion. The problem with the arthritis and tendinitis in my knees was walking on concrete sidewalks. I switched to walking in alleys, parking lots, and side streets in residential areas. I also started wearing a support on both knees.

I was worried the knee supports might cause long term problems. The doctor said they were fine as long as I only wear them when exercising.

I am not up to where I can walk 12 miles. I went from walking 2 miles 5 days a week and 3 miles two days a week to 3-4 miles five days a week, 6-8 miles once a week, and 8-12 miles once a week. The only real limitation on how far I can walk is the available time.

It has helped that they opened a new Rails-To-Trails route in the area. The trail is mostly flat and a very easy walk. Part of it is blacktop and part is small gravel. I walk parts of the trail 3-4 times a week. I have lost over 60 pounds since being diagnosed as having diabetes early this year. I still have about 30 pounds to lose. It is great being about two thirds of the way to my eventual weight goal. Big Smile

Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 133

Walk in WATER..get some water shoes so you have traction..it really strengthen the muscles around the knee..and gets you back to street waling ..faster.

Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 133

Swimming is my main exercise but I am trying to adjust by season here in AZ....For example..it was too HOT all Summer to do much OTHER than swim..I swam 90 mins 6 mornings a week all Summer.....

Now that it is around 98/100 and not 112/115..I am back to golf a bit..just lessons and practice for Sept but..soon..I will play. This after a year off due to ankle surgery.

I will continue to swim 2-3x's a week all Winer...heated outdoor pool at the Y....and get back to PM walks...now that I am vertical again.

I like the gym/weights/machines but..need a bit more motivation for that...compared with swimming.

After a few injuries(knee/ankle) and surgery..I always get back to swim first..easy for me and easy on knees and joints..and the only sport I am good at.

But..I will improve my golf swing..I am determined.

And...maybe..just maybe..I will get back on my bike this Fall????
I swim all year round.. but try to mix it up to make it interesting...

I suggest.......find one sport as your fall-back to do regularly and then..add on other exercise/sports..as time and motivation move you.. 

Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 251
Spirit replied on Thu, Sep 10 2009 7:59 PM

Sgt Cedar:  Welcome to the forum. Already your input is appreciated.  I have been walking daily for 11 years for good diabetes management.  Has really paid off (I know this from the times I have been lazy about it).  But the hint about the walking stick is a new one for me...and a good one.  I can conceptualize the value for upper arm use.  I live very close to LL Bean and they have really cool, gnarly walking sticks.  True, something from my rural yard would work as well, but if I invest in a special one I am more likely to use it more.  Beats investing in Tim Hortons donuts, anyway!

Spirit

Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 100
kat replied on Thu, Sep 10 2009 9:52 PM

Spirit - I'm another walking stick user.  I use a telescoping one from LLBean around town when my knee is feeling especially cranky.  For trail walking and bushwhacking I always use a walking stick.  My wrist gets a bit sore after a day of hard walking stick use, but I've never noticed any particular upper arm value.  Dual walking sticks might give more upper arm exercise -- I've never used mine enough to notice.   I like the gnarly sticks, too, but regularly use a telescoping one.  It is sturdier, can be a monopod for a camera, but best of all it folds down to a size which can be carried in checked luggage.  Some of the dual sticks have some sort of spring mechanism. 

I wonder why I always manage to find a Tim Hortons to tempt (but mostly pass) on my way to LLBeans.

 

T2, diagnosed 12/98.  Diet and exercise 2/03 - 11/08.  Now back on metformin 500 ER.

Top 75 Contributor
Male
Posts 13
SgtCedar replied on Thu, Sep 10 2009 10:54 PM

I mainly use the hiking staff because I have trouble walking straight. A neurologist once told me I probably could not walk straight to save my life. I have two different sticks for different uses.

I have a long hiking staff which comes about up to my arm pit. It is made of dogwood and has the bark on it with a spiral cut in the bark. I use it mainly for longer walks. I have to make sure I switch hands from time to time or my left shoulder and elbow gets sore.

I have a cedar walking stick which I use around town or when driving. I find the derby handle on it more comfortable for shorter walks. It does not have the bark but is still distinctive looking.

Using a walking stick does allow me to walk a little faster. I am not sure if it really gives much of an upper body workout.

Both sticks were bought from brazos-walking-sticks.com. They have an amazing range of woods and designs. They are not cheap but are well made and should last a lifetime.

I couldn't agree with you more about the donuts.

Page 2 of 4 (48 items) < Previous 1 2 3 4 Next > | RSS