Migraine head aches/Type 1 diabetes

rated by 0 users
Answered (Verified) This post has 1 verified answer | 11 Replies | 7 Followers

Top 500 Contributor
Female
2 Posts
tam posted on Wed, Feb 3 2010 1:58 PM

My 12 year old daughter has type 1, and also gets migraine head aches.  Doctors have determined that the head aches are NOT related to the diabetes. We have seen a neurologist and testing has been done (MRI and EEG) and nothing was found. I was wondering if anyone has experience with migraines (that also has type 1), and what has worked for the head aches?

Thanks,

Tam

 

 

 

Answered (Verified) Verified Answer

Top 500 Contributor
Female
3 Posts
Verified by tam

hello Tam, my dad has tipe 1 diabetes ( me too) and he suffers from migraine headaches, doctors always told him it wasn't related to diabetes, but over the years he found it happens when his blood sugar levels are high

All Replies

Top 500 Contributor
Female
3 Posts
Verified by tam

hello Tam, my dad has tipe 1 diabetes ( me too) and he suffers from migraine headaches, doctors always told him it wasn't related to diabetes, but over the years he found it happens when his blood sugar levels are high

Top 500 Contributor
Female
2 Posts
tam replied on Wed, Feb 3 2010 2:42 PM

Thanks for the information.  I will keep an eye on the bg levels a little closer when head aches come on.

Top 25 Contributor
Female
58 Posts
Short-Jan replied on Thu, Feb 4 2010 10:32 PM

Hi Tam,

I have type 1 and for many years suffered with migraines. I started having them when I became pregnant with my daughter at the age of 22. I stopped having them when I entered menopause thirty years later. During most of that time personal glucose meters weren't available (to me), so I don't know what my glucose level was during the migraine. I do know that pain causes my blood glucose levels to run in the 300's. 

When I was having the headaches a muscle relaxant originally prescribed by my OB was the only medication that helped.

Jan

type 1 dx. 1955

Top 10 Contributor
Female
384 Posts
jen1229 replied on Sat, Feb 6 2010 8:19 PM

I have some friends who have migraines that are not diabetic.  In most of their cases the cause is hormonal, as they come on around that time of the month and in both cases stopped at menopause.

Jen  - LevemirConfused and Novalog Wink A1c 5.8

 

 

Not Ranked
1 Posts
cristytea replied on Thu, Feb 18 2010 11:02 AM

Hey..I joined so I could respond to you, as my 11 year old Type 1 is home today with a migraine!  He has had diabetes since he was 7 and the migraines started shortly after!

Last year he was started on cyproheptad 4mg (periactin) by his pediatric doctor for migraines and it worked!  It is also used as an appetite stimulate which he needs!

We were on the medication daily for about 6 months with great results.  Stopped it and they have just recently started back. So...guess we'll go in for a refill.

Hope your daughter gets better...it's so hard to watch and not be able to take it away from them!

Not Ranked
1 Posts

I used to go right for the meds, but now I check my blood sugar first & usually its high when I think a migrain is coming on, although sometimes its hormones.( b-4 my period!)

Not Ranked
1 Posts
Donna B replied on Fri, Feb 19 2010 11:23 AM

I have had Type I since age 9 (I'm 46 now) and started getting migraines about 10 years ago.  None of the typical "after-the-fact" drugs work for me, but taking Topamax daily pretty much prevents or at least minimizes the severity of my migraines.  My non-diabetic 15-year old daughter used to get migraines until she started taking Topamax daily.  My 19 year old daughter (also non-diabetic) used to have a migraine once a month starting at age 8 until she began her period at the age of 10.  I've concluded that migraines may be related to some hormones, at least in some people.  Doctors have told us to try to find correlations between the foods we eat or various stressors and the timing of our migraines.  I haven't found any with foods, but stress definitely makes a migraine more likely for me.  (High blood sugar ranks high on my list of stressors.)  For my younger daughter, migraines are more frequent in January through March, so I try to make life as easy as possible for her during this time, without calling attention to my kid gloves!

Good luck!

 

Not Ranked
1 Posts
Answered (Not Verified) Richard replied on Fri, Feb 19 2010 10:12 PM
Suggested by Richard

Hi Tam,

I have type 1 diabetes, and have had migraine headaches all my life. I see neurology in the Boston

VA. My MRI's do show lesions and vascular changes.  I was tested for MS. because of the lesions and other symptoms.

However, neurology think the lesions are old and are related to my diabetes. The medications for my infrequent headaches (finally) have given me great relief.

I also agree that the high blood sugars absolutely can trigger the migraines.

Good Luck

Richard

 

Not Ranked
1 Posts
Suzanneb replied on Fri, Aug 5 2011 10:02 AM

Tam...have you found anything out about your daughters headaches?  My daughter began suffering from severe headaches along with a chronic daily headache back in Feb when she had a virus (sore throat, low fever & headache).  She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes July 9th.  While in the hospital her headaches went away after her blood sugar was down to normal.  We thought that was the end of the headaches and took her off the verapamil & Amitriptyline the neurologist had her on.  Her headaches have returned over the last 1 1/5 weeks. but her BG has been good.  I'm at a total loss about what to do.  Her MRI was normal and neurologist had us also rule out pseudotumor cerebri.

Top 50 Contributor
48 Posts

Thank you for your questions and comments about migraines and diabetes. While diabetes does not cause migraines, persons with migraines often have certain triggers that can set off the headache. For example, stress or illness may trigger a headache. In addition, very low or very high blood sugars may trigger a migraine. In addition, sometimes rapid changes in blood sugars may be a trigger for migraines in some people. It is important to work with your diabetes team to find the best management approach for your diabetes and to work with your neurologist or primary care team to find the best treatment for the migraines. There are some migraine medications that work at preventing the onset of the headaches and other medications that work to relieve the discomfort once the headache begins. Find the best approach for you. Thanks for sharing your question and the comments.

Debbie Butler, LICSW, CDE

Not Ranked
1 Posts
fdstop replied on Thu, Oct 20 2011 1:39 PM

Thank you very much for the information.

Take Care,

Beth

vfhilh

Page 1 of 1 (12 items) | RSS