Morning numbers

rated by 0 users
This post has 9 Replies | 4 Followers

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 2
joeze Posted: Thu, Dec 16 2010 10:36 AM

My numbers during the day,usually taken 2 hours after meals are for the most in the correct range. I am careful in my diet and activity. I usually have a small sugar free snack before bed ( 10-11PM ) and when I test in the morning my number is very high. What can I do to get that morning number down?

Top 50 Contributor
Male
Posts 28

Morning highs are called the "Dawn Phenomenon". Your liver will dump a generous supply of glucose into your system during the night and the high blood sugar results are seen when you start your day. This happens because you have gone many hours without eating, and your body supplies the extra glucose to compensate. There are different ways to handle this. Some of the following may work for you. It will depend on whether you are type 1, type 2, prediabetic, etc.

1. You can eat a high protein snack at bedtime. The protein digests slowly and supplies enough carbs so the liver does not dump the extra glucose. This did not work for me, but it does for many people.

 2. If you use insulin you can test at 3 or 4 AM and then take a small dose of fast acting insulin. If you have not started experiencing a high yet, you may have to experiment with testing every hour until you find when your blood sugar starts going high. Taking the extra insulin before the high usually occurs can help very much. but you have to be careful not to take too much. This worked for me for many years.

3. If you use a CGM (continuous glucose monitor), it can be set to alarm when your level is starting to go high. You can make it alarm for any level you want. I have mine set at 140. CGMs are very expensive, but some health insurance companies will cover them if your doctor will write a letter of necessity.

4. An insulin pump can be programmed to give varying basal rates. If the rates gradually increase during the night, then the morning highs can be eliminated. I have used a pump for three years and I do not have this problem now.

 

 

 

 

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 71
Julia replied on Thu, Dec 16 2010 6:47 PM

I agree with Richard's point #4.  An insulin pump will help with this Dawn Phenomena thing.  Unlike Richard, I still have morning numbers that are high about 1/3 of the time.  The other 2/3 are great.  I use a pump.  My doctor calls it the gremlins and I tend to agree.  But the pump is your best shot at setting your basal rates to give you more insulin in the particular hours overnight when you need it the most.

Top 25 Contributor
Male
Posts 111
Jorgie replied on Thu, Dec 16 2010 7:18 PM

I check my BG at bedtime and adjust a snack accordingly. My numbers are usually  good in the morning.

 

 

 

Type II Humalog three times a day and Lantus at bedtime.

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 3
DanB replied on Sat, Apr 2 2011 8:44 AM

I can't thank you enough for this information!  I was recently diagnosed, but have been pre-diabetic for about 5 years.  I demanded a meter from my doctor, and have been noticing that no matter what I eat or drink, my numbers are normal at bed-time, but seem consistently high in the morning.  I've been banging my head for a couple of weeks now trying to figure out what's causing it and what I can do to control it.  At least I know what to call it and *something* to, at least, try.  I sure how this is my key!

Thanks again!

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 172
Madman replied on Sat, Apr 2 2011 5:32 PM

If the high protein snack doesn't work for you, you can also try a small carb based snack.  Some find that a few crackers with a little peanut butter or cheese works well for them.  The fat in the peanut butter (or cheese) slows the digestion of the carbs and helps spread the glucose load out over a longer period of time, allowing for your system to deal with it better.  The added carbs can help keep the liver from going into dump mode.

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 107
nance replied on Sat, Apr 2 2011 5:47 PM

DanB:

I can't thank you enough for this information!  I was recently diagnosed, but have been pre-diabetic for about 5 years.  I demanded a meter from my doctor, and have been noticing that no matter what I eat or drink, my numbers are normal at bed-time, but seem consistently high in the morning.  I've been banging my head for a couple of weeks now trying to figure out what's causing it and what I can do to control it.  At least I know what to call it and *something* to, at least, try.  I sure how this is my key!

Thanks again!

Two things work for me: I need to have good numbers at bedtime, AND a certain total minutes of exercise done by the end of the day.  For me, food doesn't do it.  But exercise gets the numbers where they should be, and keeps them there all night.  How many minutes are you currently doing?

Nance, T2 dx 7/98; diet and exercise/no meds 11 yrs; 500mg Glucophage XR 4/day, 5mg Glucotrol XL 3/day; A1c av. in 6s.  Treadmill, elliptical, biking, Arc trainer, dumbbells, other resistance moves -- 30-60 minutes a day.

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 3
DanB replied on Sun, Apr 3 2011 12:08 PM

This, too, would explain why, this past week, I had a few days where my numbers were lower in the morning, as I had had a pudding just before bed.  It didn't work every night, so I'll try the higher protien.  Last night, although I was higher when I went to bed, I had a protien snack and was in the 90's range this morning.

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 3
DanB replied on Sun, Apr 3 2011 12:18 PM

My numbers are usually low when I go to bed, that's the weird thing (to me).  I get to the gym about 2X per week, but when I do it's a minimum of 30 minutes - I usually spend a hour working out.  On most other days, I take a 20 minute walk at lunch if the weather is good, and then there's the 2-year old dog who needs constant exercise, so we walk 2-3 miles per day with her - and it's not a sauntering walk.  I try to keep a brisk pace and have a flexi-leash so I can keep going and don't have to stop when she does.  It's also spread out throughout the day, usually, so it's often hard to determine exactly how far I've gone each day, but our short walk is .6 of a mile and the next shortest walk is just shy of a mile and that takes about 20 minutes, but I don't think exercise is crucial to my situation, as in the last 4 months, I'm down 10 lbs and 2% body fat and I was still tagged as diabetic - not that exercise is not important, but I've found it doesn't amtter if I have exercised the day before or not, the numbers are still high in the morning.  So, I do what I can.  I do not consider myself "overweight", but I could shave off a few more pounds (I'm 5'8" and 186), but I can also do 20 pushups in 30 seconds and can benchpress about 90lbs, so some of that *has* to be muscle.  (maybe I'm still in denial, but I don't think so).

I did notice that last night, although I was abnormally higher before bed (112), I did have a protien snack and this morning I was 94.

Thanks for the advice - every little bit helps.  Off to walk the dog!

 

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 107
nance replied on Sun, Apr 3 2011 6:58 PM

Your workout routine does sound good, Dan.  I, too, spread my exercise out over the day, but also do some in the evening, which is a big help.  I usually do from a third to half of my exercise in the evening.  Occasionally more if I've missed some daytime exercise.

Nance, T2 dx 7/98; diet and exercise/no meds 11 yrs; 500mg Glucophage XR 4/day, 5mg Glucotrol XL 3/day; A1c av. in 6s.  Treadmill, elliptical, biking, Arc trainer, dumbbells, other resistance moves -- 30-60 minutes a day.

Page 1 of 1 (10 items) | RSS