Glimepiride and weight gain

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Dee replied on Mon, Feb 23 2009 4:41 PM

Nora~believe me I know about the drug increasing the fat storage.  I only used it for 90 days, and it left me with a very thick middle!  It is the only place that I wish to lose weight, and knowing that cardio is my best bet to remove this fat is a daunting task ahead for me.  I have chronic bursitis which prevents me from walking fast, and the eliptical aggravates my condition even more.  I am hoping that Spring weather arriving soon will permit longer walks that I can endure without problems.  Any other suggestions for losing that fat??  Thanks, Dee

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Why do so many people think cardio is the best or only way to lose weight and/or body fat?

Light weight lifting. lower weights, high reps between 10 to 20 will get your heart rate up, and provide an active metabolic increase for up to 36 hours after the workout. It is also a very efficient way to use glucose.

Done right, it's very low impact. it won't aggravate your bursitis, and will strengthen you whole body. There are a lot of body weight (without weights or equipment) core workouts you can do as well.

Active weight lifting burns more calories per hour than almost any other sport, short of swimming and wrestling.

Most gyms seem daunting, but the truth is just the opposite. The big cut monsters that look so intimidating are generally very nice, and will enthustically help you if asked.

 1000mg of metformin is keeping my numbers nice and "normal" with the exercise. My last  several A1c have shown values in the low 5's. Part of that is due to the lifting. This is from someone who had a BG level of 570 2 years ago.

Good luck,

 

Scott

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mrfino replied on Tue, Feb 24 2009 8:54 AM

Scott:

Welcome to the Boards. Since diabetes is a progressive disease and varies somewhat from person to person, I'm wondering if you mind telling us when you were diagnosed (I'm assuming you have Type 2). That would provide some context for the success you've achieved with weight training and metformin. A1C in the low 5s is great. Congratulations on finding a formula for diabetes management that works for you. Is there a specific weight program that you follow? Thanks for contributing to the discussion.


John

Type 2 Dx 1995, metformin and glimepiride

 

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Ron AKA replied on Tue, Feb 24 2009 5:49 PM

Scott Sanda:

Why do so many people think cardio is the best or only way to lose weight and/or body fat?

Scott, I agree that there is a place for resistance training in addition to cardio. I think one of the main benefits of weight training is increasing muscle mass. The extra muscle tends to reduce insulin resistance, and may be partially accounting for your excellent A1C. People probably go to cardio first as you can control heart rate very well and exercise at your limit without risking your safety. It probably packs in the most calories lost in the shortest period of time, depending on how you weight lift. Some do it with a lot of rest between lifts, and I can see some not having the time/patience for that. Further some lift weights so heavy that they cannot do it every day. The other issue for weight lifting for diabetics is blood pressure. Heavy weights especially with improper breathing can easily double your blood pressure for short periods of time. This combined with diabetes damaged blood vessels (eye, kidneys) can be trouble.

For me, I find 1 hour of cardio (20 min treadmill, 20 min bike, 20 min on cross trainer), followed by 15 minutes of weights does work well. I either do light weights every day or heavy weights every second day.

Ron

Not a med prof. Just diabetic type 2 on Prandin, Levemir, ramipril, bisoprolol, & Crestor. Diag. Feb/01.

"I have not failed. I have just found 10,000 ways that don't work." - Thomas Edison

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John,

I've been on the old board for a while, found it right after being diagnosed, but I mostly lurk.

2 years ago I started losing major weight, then had vastly increased urine and thirst (I know, classic, but what did I know). then my eyesight went bad. Really bad, in about a week. Eyedoctor said "are you diabetic?" I said no.... but I bought a tester and every test I took was over 550. I didn't know that from adam, and my GP wouldn't make an appointment to see me (I have a new one now). They did say go to the emergency room, so I did.  Ultimatly I lost 45 pounds, including a lot of muscle mass. At the onset I was 41, 270 pounds, 6 foot tall and still played the occasional rugby game. I was also going to the gym regularly.

1500 MG of metformin and 4mg or glimperide plus a scared strict diet brought me back under control, and for the past 18 months, I have been using 1000 mg metformin total, and 2mg glimperide. I dropped the Glimp a couple of months ago. I don't follow a strict diet, but I don't eat a lot of junk either. I can have the occasional regular soda, and my BG comes right back down.

If I stop the metformin, my BG starts to creep up again.

I'm back up to 270, but my body fat content is still down from where it was. I have a ton of muscle mass, needles to say.

For exercise, I lift pretty heavy 2 to 3 times a week, and I bike several hours a week (on a trainer now that the snow has arrived).

That's not what I am suggesting for people who are not long time lifters or built like tanks. I'm suggesting light to moderate basic lifts, chest, shoulders, lats, tricepts and biceps, and some leg work. You can do it all with dumbells and without a partner, and you don't need to do it all.

Pick a weight that you can move 20 times with some effort. Increase it a little, and do 3 sets of 15-20. You will feel it for the first 2 weeks. That pain is the muscle fiber breaking down and rebuilding, and your lactic acid transport system adapting and getting more efficient.

The goal isn't to hurt, it is to build and strengthen muscle fiber, an activity which keeps happening for 36 hours of so after each workout. I don't recall the technical terms, but it works.

Better yet, weights in conjunction with low impact cardio.

is it right for everyone? Not at all. Everyone is different. Is it an option for someone who has difficulty walking, running or doing some other type of pure cardio workout.

Good luck,

 

Scott

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Ron,

You just hit some of the issues right on the head. Your workout is great, and obviously fits your needs well. strength training is misunderstood and is surrounded by rumors and stereotypes (kinda like diabetes)

I'd say that unless you are already an athlete, or are highly trained and used to/fit enough for high level output you should not lift in such a way that you require long periods of recovery between sets. Circut train, high repetition, low weight builds endurance, strength and not a lot of mass. I don't have any of the traditional other side effects yet, and hope I never do, but it is a progressive disease.

I firmly believe it was a diet of crap and soda that overloaded and "burned out" my receptor sites, and that the Metformin currently sufficiently stimulates them enough to do their jobs now that I'm not bombarding them with high fructose corn syrup.

Scott

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mrfino replied on Wed, Feb 25 2009 10:01 AM

Scott:

Thanks. Sorry I didn't recognize you from the old boards.

I've had adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) in both shoulders over the last 4 years (I understand people with diabetes are more prone to this condition than people who do not have diabetes). I definitely need to do something to improve my upper body mobility and, more to the point, strength. I'll look into starting, very slowly, some kind of light weight program. I'm 48 years old and I shouldn't be this weak and tight.

John

Type 2 dx in '95

Metformin and Glimepiride


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John,

 

Find a good masseuse. Seriously. A lot of joint issues can be traced directly to muscles that are either locked up, weak, or compensating for something. My wife is a competitive triathlete and a pretty hard core bike racer, and if she didn't get her massages, she'd be a pretzel.

A good one will hurt you initially, but after everything is released you will wonder how you ever let it get so bad.

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mrfino replied on Thu, Feb 26 2009 9:08 AM

Scott:

I solved the shoulder problem, for the most part, by going to a guy who is a physical therapist and a chiropractor. According to the bill I received for his services, I went for several sessions of "neuromuscular reeducation". I love that phrase. After I was "reeducated" his advice was "don't let it get frozen again." Good advice. But massage sounds good too.

John

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